Woolly Rhino Facts for Kids – Interesting Woolly Rhino Facts

The woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis) is an extinct rhino species that inhabited much of the northern Asia and almost entire Europe. The rhino lived in the Pleistocene epoch and the last of the specimens survived up to the last glacial period.

Woolly Rhino Facts for Kids

It had first arrived 350,000 years ago and the last of the woolly rhino died around 10,000 years ago.

Woolly rhinoceros was the last member of the rhino lineage. It had a strong built and dense woolly pelage one that is suited to living in extreme weather conditions.

The oldest fossil of a woolly rhino belonged to 3.6 million years ago. It was discovered in the Tibetan Plateau.

woolly rhino facts for kidsThe closest cousins of woolly rhinos are Sumatran rhinoceroses. Scientists studied the appearance of woolly rhinos from the cave paintings in Siberia.

Adult rhinos would grow up to 9.8 – 12.5 feet in length. Woolly rhinos weighed as much as 4,000 – 6,000 pounds.

The shoulder height of an adult rhino measured up to 6.6 feet. Woolly rhinos were only slightly bigger than the white rhinoceros.

They had 61-cm long horns. Woolly rhinos had thick stocky legs, dense shaggy coat, short horns, long furs, and small ears. They had two horns.

Woolly Rhino Diet: Woolly rhinos had herbivorous diet. They were regular browsers and grazers.

Studies suggest that woolly rhinos had white dark band that runs between the hind and front legs.

As is typical of a rhinoceros, woolly rhinos would use its horns not only in defense—they would also attract mates using their horns.

Woolly Rhino Habitat: Woolly rhinos had lived in the southern England and North Sea and just about every country of Europe. During the Pleistocene epoch, the rhino made its habitats in grasslands and tundra as well as occupying cold deserts of Europe. The rhino shared its habitat with other large herbivorous mammals such as woolly mammoths.

They used to live in pretty small groups but mostly woolly rhinos would move alone.

The female rhino would produce 1 to 2 calves.


Woolly Rhino Facts for Kids – Video

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